Decay Prevention Guide

Brushing and flossing each night before bedtime is the only way to thoroughly clean your child’s teeth to prevent decay.

Brushing

  1. Three times per day (after meals) and especially before bedtime.
  2. Brush in a circular motion, never back-and-forth.
  3. All fluoride toothpastes are good to use. If your child does not like the taste of toothpaste, use baking soday or even plain water.
  4. Use a SOFT bristled toothbrush.
  5. Brush the tongue and gums.

Flossing

  1. Flossing needs to be done each night before bedtime.
  2. Start flossing when the back teeth are close together, usually around 3 to 4 years of age.
  3. Waxed dental floss is the best. Children tend to enjoy flavored dental floss.
* Do not expect your child to be able to do this by themselves in the beginning. It is recommended that every child under 8 years of age should have adult supervision. We also recommend that parents always do the the flossing for children age 5 and younger.

Eat Healthy Foods; Limit Sugars and Sweets

What your child eats influences the health of the teeth. A child who eats lots of sugar has a good chance of getting cavities. Here are a few Healthy Tips:

  1. Save sugar foods for dessert.
  2. Chew sugarless gum.
  3. Since most medicines are full of sugar to make them taste better, brush after each dose.
  4. EAT HEALTHY SNACKS – NO SUGAR FOODS! Fruits, cheeses and crackers are just a few good choices.

Fluorides:

  1. Each night use a “Topical Fluoride Gel” on your child’s teeth. We recommed Omni Gel or Gel-Kam because the children can choose from 5 different flavors and it works great.
  2. After Brushing and Flossing at bedtime, apply the fluoride gel to the toothbrush. Brush the teeth again with the gel, then have your child spit out any excess. DO NOT RINSE. Letting the fluoride gel set on your child’s teeth all night strengthens the tooth enamel and helps prevent decay.
  3. Fluoride Tablets are also important. They aid in the formation of healthy and strong permanent teeth. Usually, they should only be prescribed if your water supply has insufficient fluoride levels. An acceptable level of fluoride is .7 ppm. Your water district has this information. Fluoride tablets are not usually needed after the age of 11.